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Why do I hear a rumble sound during playback of some voices, especially with deeper tones or base-heavy audio?

Mechanical noise or instability: The rumble sound is often caused by mechanical noise or instability within the playback system, which can generate low-frequency vibrations that affect the quality of the playback.

Turntable rumble: In the case of turntables, rumble can be attributed to factors such as bearing wear, motor vibration, or variations in vinyl quality.

High-pass filters: To mitigate rumble, high-pass filters can be used to remove low-frequency noise from the audio signal.

Mechanical vibrations: Mechanical vibrations from the turntable can also contribute to the rumble sound, which can be addressed by addressing the mechanical noise or instability in the system.

Unwanted vibrations: Unwanted vibrations can be caused by the physical movement of the arm or cartridge on the turntable, which can generate low-frequency vibrations that affect the playback.

Mechanical resonance: Mechanical resonance can also contribute to the rumble sound, where the vibrations generated by the playback system resonate with the physical properties of the equipment, amplifying the low-frequency noise.

Audio signal processing: Audio signal processing techniques, such as equalization and compression, can help to mitigate the effects of rumble and improve the overall quality of the playback.

Physics of sound: The physics of sound dictate that low-frequency vibrations can travel through the physical medium of the playback equipment, causing the rumble sound to be perceived.

Audio coding: Audio coding techniques, such as lossy compression, can also affect the quality of the playback and contribute to the rumble sound.

Acoustic coupling: Acoustic coupling between the playback equipment and the surrounding environment can also contribute to the rumble sound, where the vibrations generated by the playback equipment are transmitted through the air or solid medium.

Psychoacoustics: Psychoacoustics, the study of the psychological effects of sound, suggests that human perception of sound is influenced by the amplitude and frequency of the sound, which can affect the perception of the rumble sound.

Perceptual bias: Perceptual bias, where our brains can adapt to certain sounds and influences our perception of them, can also play a role in the perception of rumble sound.

Signal-to-noise ratio: The signal-to-noise ratio of the playback equipment, defined as the ratio of the strength of the desired signal to the strength of the unwanted noise, can also affect the perception of the rumble sound.

Frequency response: The frequency response of the playback equipment, defined as the range of frequencies that the equipment is capable of producing or detecting, can also affect the perception of the rumble sound.

Bit depth: The bit depth of the audio recording, defined as the number of bits used to represent the amplitude of the sound signal, can also affect the quality of the playback and contribute to the rumble sound.

Sample rate: The sample rate of the audio recording, defined as the number of times per second the signal is sampled, can also affect the quality of the playback and contribute to the rumble sound.

Audio compression: Audio compression, where the amplitude of the sound signal is reduced to reduce the overall dynamic range of the sound, can also affect the quality of the playback and contribute to the rumble sound.

Audio phase: Audio phase, where the timing of the sound signal is altered to improve the quality of the playback, can also affect the quality of the playback and contribute to the rumble sound.

Audio distortion: Audio distortion, where the waveform of the sound signal is altered by the playback equipment, can also contribute to the rumble sound.

Audio amplification: Audio amplification, where the amplitude of the sound signal is increased to improve the quality of the playback, can also contribute to the rumble sound.

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